Organic Waste Management in Apartments

Final Report for the ERTDI-funded project 2005-WRM-DS-23, by Carmel Carey, Warren Phelan & Conall Boland

Summary: Final Report for the ERTDI-funded project 2005-WRM-DS-23, by Carmel Carey, Warren Phelan & Conall Boland

Published: 2008

ISBN: 1-84095-241-5

Pages: 64

Filesize: 956KB

Format: pdf

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This 10-month desk study was carried out by RPS as part of the ERTDI Programme 2000–2006 to address the issue of organic waste management at apartments in Ireland.

Organic waste (i.e. food and garden waste) constitutes the single largest component (~36%) of household waste. Irish waste management policy requires source separation of organic household waste to divert this material away from landfill to higher treatment options. The preferred sustainable option is to biologically treat organic waste and produce a valuable reusable end product, i.e. compost.

Governmental awareness-raising campaigns and increased participation in new source-separate waste collection schemes have seen a move away from the traditional method of disposal to landfill to recycling and recovery. In 2005, the pay-by-use system was introduced nationwide to encourage source segregation and to allow the waste management system to be equitable. Separate kerbside collection of mixed dry recyclables is now operating in all local authorities in Ireland although the level of coverage varies in each county.

For organic waste, four local authorities (Galway City and County and Waterford City and County Councils) have organic waste collection schemes established in the past few years for both single and multi-storey dwellings, and two Dublin local authorities (Fingal County Council and Dublin City Council) have recently commenced pilot schemes. For the most part, the organic waste collection schemes in Ireland serve single-dwelling houses with a very small number of apartment complexes included.